Author Archives: danielstinton

“Load of Bullocks” Weekly Report

I was tempted to go with “Handful of Plums” for the weekly report title, but the Bullock had to win this time.  What an epic week with groups of Harriers all over the place taking on ultras, trail runs, fast road races and lugging sacks of coal up hills.  Here’s what happened!

The Bullock Smithy

The big one in the club champs this year, the Bullock Smithy is a 56-mile circular course starting and finishing in Hazel Grove.  This route has been well trodden by the Harriers, with so many recces popping up on Strava for the last few months, it was rumoured even Luke Holme wouldn’t get lost.  I tried to follow the tracker, but it was pretty hopeless so it was a good job there were some roving GDH reporters (Tracey and Lucy) deployed around the route to keep us up-to-date throughout the day.  Each runner will have their own story to tell on such a huge race, but here is Ian Crutchley’s take on events:

On the stroke of the anvil we set off at sub 8 minute mile pace (as you do on an ultra) and amusingly encountered the umpteen ideas of route variances within that first few miles. 9 times from 10 we ended up meeting the route in exactly the same place as your mate who swore the other way was shorter. Will moved ahead from the start, and by chinley churn Lance got sick of listening to us talk crap and moved ahead too. From here it was Skuse, Joe and me all the way.

To summarise the rest that I know of, Lins caught us up at Edale, looking very strong and we left her and Luke by Peak Forest still in fine fettle. With a few others Paul rescued a sheep at the top of cow low with an 8ft branch caught in its horns. We heard Nick had pulled out at CP1 with dizziness again. A real shame for the Bullock veteran. Lins and Pepper made it to Brand Top (39 miles) before deciding enough was enough. Luke pulled up at Cumberland Cottage (43 miles) with knee issues. Really felt for him, his second attempt at the Bullock. Paul and Joe got chased by cows in Earl Sterndale while I hurled abuse at them from the safety of the gate. We convinced a lad who was on the verge of quitting to continue as he’d made such good time. He stayed with us through 2 checkpoints then had an amazing second wind and buggered off ahead.

At walker barn (47 miles) we heard the record had gone with a Penny Lane lad doing 8.10, beating the previous by 35 minutes. Phenomenal. At this point our little band was in a sorry state. We knew Lance and Will had teamed up and were probably finished, and the rest were somewhere behind. We found the live tracker was all but useless, as it only listed runners by number, which is great when you know peoples number! We soldiered on and the last 5 miles or so we’re truly horrific with Joe making some extraordinary groaning noises and even Skuse struggling to remain cheery. The 3 of us got overtaken by a much older gentleman in the closing 500 metres, we literally had no answer for his surprise surge from behind. Each of the three of us had had difficult spells on the route, but we pulled each other through and largely enjoyed it I think. From what I can tell, the group of Kate, Marie, Rachel and John had a similar experience, generally pulling each other through. And I think that’s the story of the day for the full GDH team – teamwork.

We did a lot of recceing and sharing route options, kit and information. Will Mather was instrumental in this, and knows the route better than me now! Huge kudos to everyone that turned out, because this is a quirky event, requires a good element of nav, and is also a beast! Results below (I don’t know placings). I’m summary we all did fantastic. A few very unfortunate DNFs but most did as brilliantly as we expected. But for me, stand out performers were Lance (first ultra, and had the confidence to really go for it and finished in a brilliant time), Joe (almost no running for 6 weeks his training was, well, zero. Not in good shape but his ability to suffer was truly impressive). Steve France (another ultra virgin, and from what I can tell did most if it alone and you cannot wipe the smile off the lads face). Final thanks to any GDH that were out on route. Hugely appreciated!!!!

Will and Lance – 11.16

Paul, Joe and Ian – 13.17

Steve France – 15.12

Marie, Rachel, Kate and John 19.25

Padfield Plum Fair Scamper

There were no plums or a fair, but it was in Padfield.  Paul Skuse suggested he would run this, but then bailed, giving the most horrific excuse of why he wouldn’t be attending in a text group.  It’s not suitable for the report though, so let’s just say he was too tired.

I decided last minute to give this one a go and turned up in Padfield for one of Des’s classics.  Race strategies were bandied around which generally seemed to be “go hard at the start so you don’t have to queue at the stiles.”  As it turns out, when I got to the stiles I was kind of relieved to get a few seconds rest.  For those who don’t know, the route goes up and around the cabin beyond cock hill, back down to the trig and then back to Padfield.  No nonsense racing.

The results aren’t out yet, but broadly from Strava…

Steve Knowles (Pennine) TBC

Caitlin Rice (1st GDH and 1st woman) TBC

Chris Jackson (Pennine) 41:55

Daniel Stinton 43:28

Greg Wasinski 46:47

Rob Sheldon 49:16

Ian Oates 52:46

Frank Fielding 53:24

Mary Jeal TBC

Adam Crompton deserves a big shout-out for the junior race.  He took a tumble and injured his knee but pressed on ahead and finished the race anyway! Great running!

The first thing you need to do after a fell race is carry a sack of coal up a hill, right? That’s what Caitlin Rice did.  I’ve never personally carried a sack of coal up Redgate, but I’ve definitely felt like one whenever I’ve reached the top.  Sean Phillips also had a go but I don’t know what happened or what the results were, but here’s a pic from Facebook anyway.

Dark and White autumn series – Bradfield

I saw Lucy Wasinski after the plum fair race and she looked ever so relaxed.  You’d barely have known she’d run a race, let alone won it earlier that morning.  Here’s her report:

So in other news this weekend….!! Feeling rather lame in comparison, but suitably inspired by the BS crew Pete W, Pete T, Lynne T, Kate B and I headed over to Bradfield for the first in the Autumn trail series run by Dark and White. This was approx 9.5miles, and just under 400m ascent. Gorgeous clear start to the day which also meant given it’s Sept, you wanted your gloves on first thing brrrr!

We didn’t have long to worry that we might need our jackets on, as there’s a proper treat in store 50yds after the start….oh yes, greeted with a flight of stone steps to proper get the legs crying! 

After that it was a mix of a few lanes, some wooded trails, a bit of bracken bashing, bit of boggy rocky grassy stuff, a magical mystery tunnel amongst the rhododendron (was it?!) bushes where it helped if you were less than 4ft tall, and a long climb from the resers before the 10k mark and then pretty much all downhill to the finish. Which is the best bit…cos it means tea and cake and crisps. 

Brilliant fun and great company and so good to have more GDH doing these races! As skuse says, it’s all runnable! (Pretty much!)

Results when Lynne and Kate left as follows (starts in 10 min waves so results change as folk get back)

Lucy 1:17:32 – 9th and first female

Pete W1:28:20 – 25th

Pete T 1:33:39 – 32nd

Lynne&Kate 1:54:40

Salford 10km

A good turnout at the Salford 10km this morning.  Some FB pictures suggest half of the cast of Star Wars was there too.  Here are the results:

David Chrystie-Lowe 43:13

Mike Park 43:58

Joanne Brack 48:32

Tony Hillier 50:07

Wendy McMahon 50:29

Charmayne Brierley 51:49

Kaylea Haynes 51:44

Wioleta Wydrych 52:05

Malcolm Brown 59:16

William Mather 01:00:59

Laurie Barlow 01:10:22

Great North Run

A few people turned up for a half marathon somewhere in the north-east, not one I’d heard of, but it will probably catch on.  A chap called Mo said he had loads of time to spare after his race so sent over the GDH results:

Michael Greenhalgh 01:34:10

David Munday 02:42:35

Paul Amos 02:42:48

Liam Amos 02:44:33

Longstone Chase

Fell? Trail? I don’t know but here’s the report from Pete Wallroth:

Longstone Chase fell race was…..woah….hang on there a second!

That should read (as I’ve come to realise anything in this neck of the woods should ie Calver, Stoney Middleton, Barrell Inn et al ) trail race. 

Don’t get me wrong, it’s a good race, with cracking views but if you’d worn fell shoes for this, you’d have had bloody sore feet. It’s a trail race

Anyway, shut up you moaning git! 

This was a good one. All runnable, two fast descents, great views and a great final run in through a limestone gulley. A fast, fellless Friday. 

I was the only Harrier there due to the masses understandably preparing themselves for the madness that is the Bullock Smithy. 

Good to be out trying a new race this year as the midweek season more or less comes to an end for the Peak District fell running season. 

Marathon Du Medoc

It seems that Emma “Michelangelo” Rettig got drunk this weekend.  But rather than wait till finishing a race to celebrate she began celebrating from, well, checkpoint 1. A marathon is a long way under any circumstances, but if you have to dress up as a super hero and keep stopping for cheese and wine it becomes a gargantuan task! Here’s Emma’s report:

While most of the Club were taking in the delights of the Bullock on Saturday I opted for something a little different and ran the Marathon du Medoc

This utterly bonkers event takes place in the vineyards of the Medoc, participants must wear fancy dress and each Chateau lays out a wealth of treats to eat and glorious wine to drink

Three friends and I made it round in something resembling six and a half hours, rather squiffy but terribly happy. I’m not entirely sure what happened but we ate, drank, danced and made lots of friends. Some running must have occured but not entirely sure how!! 

Yorkshireman Off-road Marathon

I imagine this does what it says on the tin.  A marathon, off-road, likely in Yorkshire.  I just had a look at their website and the course record is 03:09:10 which seems awfully fast for a hilly off-roader.  Simon Watts gives us this report:

My third go at this great, friendly race that starts and finishes in the picturesque village of Howarth, just north of Halifax.

Time had healed my memories of how hard it was, so I felt pretty leggy after about 14miles having gone out too quick, but managed to come through in 10th overall. There’s about 900m of climbing with most of it is in the first 16 miles, giving you  great views of the valleys around Halifax.

Highly recommend this race for other Harriers next year…there is a steep cobbled street hill to finish on which you need to remember is there before you empty your legs! Only £20 too, a bargain!

Lakeland Trails Keswick 15km

Pictures don’t lie, right? Well John Pollard came 1st in the Lakeland Trails 15km in Keswick and there’s a picture of him on the podium to prove it!  Here’s his report:

What excellent events the Lakeland trails races are…a bit showbizzy compared to purists on the fells but definitely enjoyable, perhaps because they are not so brutal on the climbs.
The Keswick 15k yesterday was especially a gas, with sunshine, views, and a scintillating downhill last 2 miles.
Nice to meet Red Roser Steve Bullows, we made the podium…when it was unattended…

The Big Wet Coniston Freestyle Swim

Ok, I may have made that name up and I’m not sure if it was even an “event” but Tim Budd swam 5km along Coniston, splashing through the depths for 2.5 hours.  I generally feel like giving up after around 6 minutes of swimming so can’t even contemplate 2.5 hours! Epic stuff!

Parkrun Corner

A relatively quiet one at Glossop Parkrun this week, unsurprising with all of the other activity going on. Twelve Harriers running but no new PBs.  The consolidated club report is HERE

Top Mileage and climbing

Nothing surprising here with the Bullock Smithy entrants littering the top of the weekly Strava mileage table.  William Mather topped the chart with 117.2km but Jamie Helmer gave the hills a bash with 3,339m of climbing this week!

Anything Else?

It’s time to pretend you’re at school again and get your cross-country entries in.  It’s ridiculously cheap and you can use it as an excuse to buy a new pair of running trainers.  Check out the Facebook posts for details!

Tuesday.  Is Jeroen back? I don’t know, but there will be a speed session!  People will run in the hills and on the road on Thursday.  Business as usual folks.

There may be a few inaccuracies in the report above of course, but I’m not going to prorogue the weekly report, just let us know in the comments.  Keep sending stuff in to gdhweeklyreports@gmail.com

 

 

 

 

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The “Wettest Tuesday in Coached Session History” Weekly Report

That’s right.  Tuesday was the wettest coached session ever! Excuses were handed in to coach Jeroen on the Facebook page one after another, but still many brave souls turned up to bash out a speed session!  Just one of the myriad of things happening to the Harriers this week, but before we get into all of that, let’s talk club champs!

It’s Cracken Edge on Wednesday, the seventh of ten fell race counters.  I ran this as a recce once and I seem to remember a steep slippy concrete bit towards the end, which probably isn’t the best bit, but other than that it was a great route! Get out there and get the points in!

Without further ado, here is the report!

Jersey: Round the Rock Ultra

Jersey, tiny isn’t it?  I mean, you can barely even see it on a map.  That may be the case until you decide to run around it, and then suddenly it becomes huge.  Kate Bowden ran the “Round the Rock” ultramarathon: a 48-mile jaunt around the coastline of Jersey.  I’ve heard you can do this as a relay team, but who wants to end up halfway round Jersey waiting to see if a bus turns up?  Kate obviously didn’t and looking at Strava got round in under 11 hours – epic running!

Chunal Fell Race

Paul Skuse is like a jack-in-the-box at the moment.  The merest whisper of a race and his head springs into view, bouncing around rallying the Glossopdale army to get out there and win some races!  Here’s his report on the Chunal Fell Race:

I don’t like this race and this race doesn’t like me. The weather wasn’t as bad as expected, the race seemed to fit perfectly between very heavy downpours (didn’t help me much, I was sodden running over to the start). This brief dry spell didn’t do much to help conditions underfoot though and traction came more from tussocks and reeds wrapping themselves around shoes and shins. It was a bushwhacky, bog trotty, uppy & downy and almost no running kind of race. It was almost Lantern Pike-esque in the uppy & downy parts but spread over several sections. Only two GDH’s were racing (with the ever cheerful Jo Brack helping Des at registration). This was a blessing as there were fewer people to see my woeful efforts on the descents. Get a bell and cry “Shame!” when you see me pass. Mark D, Ben N, Immy and a whole host of GDH real fell runners would have done well in the small field of racers. No idea about results as I had to run home to miss the next downpour.

York 10km

A fast and flat course passing loads of the city’s historic gems.  What’s not to like? Paul Amos ran the 10km today and whilst I don’t have an official report Strava tells me it was hot.  Great work Paul!

Turner Landscape Fell Run

John Pollard was in the Lake District again this weekend taking on the Turner Landscape Fell Run.  He gives us the full tale below:

Recommended to do this by a few folk including Chris Jackson, and glad I did as it’s a great route and though tough with a 1000 metre of climbing to 6 different summits on a muggy 25C day, it was the most memorable and doable race I’ve done since trying to get back to the fells.

Made even more enjoyable by bumping into a frisky Andrew Fox sometime of this parish, just before the start. Andy reminded me the last time we locked horns was also in the Lakes at a Hodgson relay, but that could’ve been almost 20 years ago…and we still instantly recognised each other’s grizzled features of course.

Didn’t see Andy again until after the prize-giving, he’s a lean machine, running like a man who’s been intensively hiking the Alps (he has)…while Andy was changing in his campervan Post-race I stumbled over to hear..”1st v60, Andy Fox of GDH”. Nice medal and socks, and nice work Andy.

Think he was back in 2hrs 6..only 44 minutes ahead of me! But I ran ok and was not last for a change. The first climb up to Grey Friars after the fields from Turner Hall farm was pretty attritional in the fierce sun, a midday start meaning the mad dogs were let loose as the heat began to flare. 3 and a half miles to there up past Seathwaite tarn was the longest climb of the day, and sheltered from what westerly breeze there was it proved a sweatfest.

Followed by a good mile track up to Swirl How CP2, mercifully missing Prison Band, but also foregoing the lovely, expansive views in favour of getting my head down, then a wee pull onto Brim Fell before the steeper 1/2 mile climb to The Old Man CP3, where it was best to contour below the ridge line to avoid the tourist hordes enjoying their Saturday stroll. But nice to hear some encouraging comments, so often it’s the loneliness of the long distance fell runner which is both the pleasure and the challenge of the adventure. (There’s a book & film there somewhere.) No chance of solitude on a sunny August Saturday.

Retracing from the Old Man, it was a cut across to Goat’s Hause on awkward terrain but missing the stonier path, and then an inevitably rocky ascent of Dow Crag CP4, past the climbers, who were ascending at my rate. (I exaggerate).

I caught up a group of female runners on the easy 1/2 mile track to Brown Pike partly as I can descend many times better than I climb, and partly due to them somehow taking a wrong line off the Old Man. Then it was down to cross dusty Walna Scar Road for a trod along to White Pike CP5, a top I’d never scaled, and was relieved to find we were going up the shallow side and descending the steep side, as I was tiring now.

Finally, back to Walna Scar Road again- CP6, and on the grassy descent I picked up a couple more places and it was judderingly fast downhill for much of the rest over a mix of bog, grass and rocks to the welcome sight of the flagged finish.

That’s the route, and well worth a trip up, maybe next year some more Glossopdalers will have a crack at it. Nice atmosphere, based as it is in the sumptuous Duddon Valley, with essential tea and cakes to follow. I assumed it was called Turner Landscape for artistic reasons, but it’s run from Turner Hall Farm, so maybe not.

Just a shame you have to drive up the narrow Seathwaite road, avoiding the huge Range Rovers &MPVs exploring the valley or going over to Eskdale on the Hardknott Pass. But I guess we all leave a carbon footprint.

Hong Kong Hash Running

Hash and running were two words I’d never put together, but it is actually a thing, and not in a “let’s sit down and talk about how cool running is” kind of way.  It appears to be some kind of group trail run where the group try and find the route which may include short cuts and dead ends with lots of looping back to work out the route.  I don’t really know to be honest, but it sounds pretty sounds interesting! Emma Peters reports from Asia:

For those of you who don’t know, I have spent the past 2 months in Mongolian hospitals on elective placement as part of my university degree. Since hearing that I was going to Asia, Jeroen put me in contact with Rachel Sproston (a Harrier who lives in Hong Kong).

My friends and I met up with Rachel and her parter Mike and friend Mitch when they were also in Mongolia, where Rachel invited us on a Hash House Harriers run in Hong Kong.

Today my friend Emma and I went on one of these famed Hash runs on Lamma Island, where we had a lot of fun and were made to feel incredibly welcome.  We ran for around 8km along a marked trail including dead ends and checkpoints to keep fast runners looping back and therefore keep the group a bit more together. We then also had a few drinks and a lovely meal out. I just want to thank Rachel for the invite and encourage other harriers to always make the most of the surprisingly global network that we have here at GDH.

Long Mynd

Not satisfied with the hills here, Zoe Barton and Rachel Walton took a trip to Shropshire and sent in this report: 

Me and Dr Walton did a little Long Mynd excursion on Saturday. We were camping in the area and it’d have been rude not to. Plenty of wimberry picking and admirage of views. Oh and I found a farmyard bog to sink into. 

 

Prudential Ride London

Ok, ok, this isn’t about running, but when I reviewed the official “Glossopdale Harriers Report Writing Manual” I discovered that covering other sports isn’t banned, other than chapter 8, paragraph 17c) which restricts any mention of mud-wrestling.  Apparently, this is because of something that happened in 2002, but no-one who was around at the time is willing to talk about it.

Mandy Beames was in our Capital this weekend on the 100-mile closed road sportif – the Prudential Ride London.  I’m not sure on the outcome but the tracker shows 86 miles, let’s hope  it all went well!

Brompton World Championships

I’d also taken the torturous trip down the M1 to take part in another part of the Ride London festivities.  I’d managed to get a place in the Brompton World Championships – not by any cycling skill of course, but through a reserve ballot.  You have to do a short sprint, unfold your bike and then do 8 laps of the 2km course as fast as you can.  Lycra is banned and a suit jacket, collar and tie is compulsory – so it’s all very serious!

Don’t be fooled though, there was some serious racers here and it turned into quite an adrenaline fuelled half-hour (hot work in a wool suit jacket).  I absolutely loved jostling and weaving around the course and when the elites comes whizzing past at breakneck speed it was very exhilarating!!  I have no idea of the results but the race is over when the first person finishes and I think I managed 7 of the 8 laps in around 27 minutes. Who needs hills and the countryside eh? (me, me, me!)

Parkrun Corner

A good turnout at our parkrun this week with 14 Harriers running and Kirsty Marie Sharp the first harrier home.  Check out the consolidate club report HERE

Many of you will have noticed a couple of our very own Harriers featured on the main parkrun page advertising the milestone t-shirts.  Fantastic to see Harriers and Glossop taking a spot on the main stage!

Whilst we’re talking about loops around Manor Park, now seems like the ideal moment to mention the Manor Park Marathon (#MPM) on Saturday 24th August along with its big brother, the Ultra Trail Manor Park (#UTMP).  It’s all a bit of fun, so come along and do as many laps as you feel like before the parkrun!

To claim a coveted MPM title you need to complete 27 laps (including parkrun), just let me know your exact start time and number of laps and I’ll juggle it all into some kind of “official” results.  It would be great to see a load of blue and orange scattered around the park all morning!  Whilst most people’s first reaction is that this sounds horrible, official exit polls last year confirmed that an unconfirmed percentage of runners didn’t not feel like it wasn’t something they would maybe never not do again.  So there you go.

Top Mileage and climbing

As of 19:20 Sunday, Tony Hillier takes the top spot bagging 89km, but it also looks like someone has measured Chris Jackson who is officially 3,890m.  Or maybe that’s the elevation he took on this week, who knows?

Anything Else?

There will be a (probably drier) session on Tuesday with Jeroen and a run into the hills or around Glossop on Thursday and don’t forget Cracken Edge on Wednesday!  For something different, let’s finish with a caption competition!  WiIliam Mather found something unusual in the hills this week and here it is! Captions in the Facebook comments please! (this is only a test to see if anyone reads to the end of this report!)

As ever, if something is missed then let us know in the Facebook comments and keep sending in your Harrier shenanigans to gdhweeklyreports@gmail.com

“If only that was the last of the rain” Weekly Report

Nowadays you don’t need to wait for Michael Fish’s weather report, you just have a scroll through Strava.  From the titles I can reliably inform everyone that it’s been a warm one, sunny, humid and in some cases brutal.  Of course though, now it seems to be raining again…

Here’s the weekly report.

Kinder Trog

Don’t have a fight with rocks on Kinder.  That’s the take-home message from the Kinder Trog today.  Immy Trinder (who found out the hard way) gives us this report:

GDH lineup for Kinder Trog was John S, Jo B, Alison H, Charmayne B, Matt C, Dan S and myself. It was nothing if not an eventful day. Dan and I chugged round together, and it was all going well until we were heading towards the Downfall where I decided it was a good time to have a fight with the floor. Following a moment of bemusement I worked out how to peel myself off the gritstone, shouted at Dan for trying to help me (classic, sorry Dan) and after a wobbly-bottom-lip moment and being overtaken by Matt, we cracked on. It has been suggested that I might call this kind of a disagreement with the floor a ‘John Stephenson’, although as far as I’m aware he managed to stay on his feet today for the duration!

It was lovely to see Tracey R, Cecil and Mark D out on route. It was especially nice to see Marco’s big box of Haribo! Meanwhile, Matt had a hot date with a PB but unfortunately it wasn’t to be, as we discovered when we caught him up in the final few kilometres. A knee problem, which had something to do with a gate that I didn’t quite grasp, was to blame.

Alison had a great race and put her HPM demons to rest. She encountered a minor nav mishap but got round without fighting any inanimate objects. Jo, Charm and John ran together, the report from Jo being that they ‘all enjoyed it but it was bloomin’ hard work!”

Fight for 1st GDH came down to a sprint finish between Dan and myself, which I won, although I’m pretty sure if it hadn’t been for the variety of mitigating circumstances including Matt’s knee, and Dan sticking with me after my face-plant, it might have been very different!

I knew I didn’t stand a chance on a sprint finish with Immy but it made it quite an exciting ending in around 2:44.  The results don’t seem to be out yet so we’ll get them posted on the facebook page.  Great local long racing…. well done all!

(Also to add Chris Jackson and Frank Fielding were out there for Pennine)

Buttermere Horseshoe

The Lakeland Classics Trophy started back in 2002 and has grown ever since.  It covers six classic Lakeland races and the best three performances count. Chris Webb took on the Buttermere horseshoe and sent in the report below:

Tim Culshaw and I headed up to Loweswater on a glorious day to run the Buttermere Horseshoe fell race. At 22miles/9000ft it’s statistically the toughest of the Lakeland Classics and the heat spiced it up even more this year. Finlay Wild turned up so the winner was never in doubt (he broke the course record I believe, unsurprisingly) but for the rest of us we were trying to get round without the wheels coming off!

I was going well until Haystacks when a nav error cost me a few mins; that combined with the sun really beating down at that point made for hard going over Red Pike and High Stile. I rallied on the descent of Scale Force (despite another minor nav error) and managed to climb Mellbreak without too much suffering.

Tim meanwhile was smug with his controlled effort early on, “feeling great” he said over Grasmoor. It’s still early in the race though and he had his fair share of suffering and minor nav mishaps on the way back. Still, with Edith only 3 weeks old and off the back of very little sleep Tim finished strong, storming past the Kirkstile Inn beer garden like a man possessed! I can highly recommend this race for anyone wanting a long, challenge fell race on a beautiful route.

Final results:

Chris Webb: 12th in 4hrs 51mins

Tim Culshaw: 27th in 5hrs 29mins

The Spine Flare

The summer version of the Spine Challenger (108 miles) is happening right now.  I’ve just looked at the tracker and Sue Clapham finished in 36:04:04.  I don’t have any details, but absolutely epic running – I hope we can hear all about it!

A Trio of 10kms

Why just run one race in a week, when you can do three?  John Pollard took on Marple, the Hawkshead 10km and the Shirgley Stag fell race, and tells us below how it went.  It seems Lance Hamilton-Griffiths also made an appearance:

To complete a trio of 10k races in 7 days, starting with Marple trail on Sunday, I first ran the Hawkshead 10k road race around pretty little Esthwaite Water in the heart of the Lakes on a gorgeous Wednesday evening.

Now I did intend to do the Langstrath fell race in Borrowdale (honest guv) but didn’t leave enough time to drive down the valley, a pity as it’s the most beautiful route up to Watendlath tarn, but I thought I’d let Ricky Lightfoot win that for the umpteenth time.

So instead I mingled among the assorted Kendal AAC & Eden road runners to do what is truthfully quite a tedious undulating metalled loop, views notwithstanding, around Esthwaite. Good hard running though and getting me fit to finish in 51.02, with a burger and beer reward provided by the slightly chaotic organisers in Hawkshead afterwards.

That was a road and trail completed and on Saturday afternoon it was the Fell run, a new race at Pott Shrigley, tucked away by Shrigley Hall in the local village Rose Queen fete.

Charming Cheshire. A varied route, supposedly 10 k, pretty much all runnable, touching on Lyme Park at the Bow Stones and the most enjoyable run of the week.

I was short of concentration on one downhill section in the woods and went a*** over t*t, a reminder not to be so careless…but felt I ran ok to finish 3rd v60 in 57.25.

Lance Hamilton-Griffiths appears to have finished about 36th in 47.12 but I didn’t catch sight of him at that pace. Well ran sir.

Whether this all means I’m going to have the stamina for next week’s Ambleside trail half marathon I’ll have to see.

Kingsway Track 5km

Rochdale? What happens there? I have no idea usually, but earlier in the week Immy Trinder and I attended a chip-timed track 5km at the Kingsway track.  It seems to be a collaboration set up by the Rochdale Triathlon Club, Royton Road Runners and Rochdale Harriers.  There are three separate races (sub-20, 20-25min, 25+mins) and a junior 2km.

I somehow managed a PB of 18:43 and Immy came over the line in 20:30.

It costs £4, you get a print-out of all your lap times and you get to feel like a proper athlete for a bit – highly recommended!

Colshaw 10km

Alex Critcher provided an in-depth review of the Colshaw 10km on Stava.  How was it Alex?

“Awful”.  So, there you go.

Parkrun Corner

A load of Harriers enjoying a warm Parkrun yesterday with 17 on the start line.  Caitlin Rice was first GDH followed by Sean Phillips.  Perusing Strava it looks Sean did an extensive warm-up of 18-19kms, nothing quite like getting the legs ready for a Parkrun, eh?

Luke Holme, probably powered by a vampire-bite from T100, bagged a PB at 20:34.  No other PBs from GDH at the home course, but David Christie-Lowe is just two runs away from the 250 milestone.  Top running!

Check out the consolidate club report HERE

Top Mileage and Climbing

Who has been out there grinding out the miles and powering up those hills?  On the GDH Strava group, this week Steve Knight has clocked up an impressive 91.8km but Jenny Ross takes the elevation crown with a whopping 5,278m.

Anything Else?

As is the Harriers tradition there was a summer solstice run out into our lovely hills.  With fast-paced and busy lives getting out into the hills is always a joy, but this one has the added benefit of whisky.  A perfect time to enjoy our magnificent local playground and think about our friends old and new.

There has, of course, been a Tuesday speed session and a Thursday fell run, but it also looked like a splinter group set-out to run loops around the reservoirs.  We all know what that means! That’s right, it’s “Round the Resers” on Wednesday! This year the race will be supporting Tinttwistle Children’s Gala, a local charity providing activities for young people in the community.  I’m sure a good bunch of the blue and orange army will be there!

Guy Riddell is beating the drum for the Chester Marathon in October – get your entires in!  Chatter of Bullock Smithy recces seems to be all over the place.  The Manor Park Marathon looks likely to be happening on August Bank Holiday… I’ve spotted a recce of “Lakes in a Day” out there on Strava – have fun on that one!  Basically, it’s all going on Harriers!

That’s all i’ve spotted or been sent this week – if there’s anything missing then please let us know what happened in the Facebook comments!

Keep flinging the reports and pictures in to the GDH report-writing-crew at gdhweeklyreports@gmail.com

 

Everything Happened.  Then Even More Happened.  The Weekly Report.

I’m not even sure where to start this week.  Harriers have been all over the place, some even as far as Hayfield.  There have been vampires, incidents in portaloos, swearing, potential puking and turned ankles.  A typical week in the world of Glossopdale Harriers!

Hayfield: Three Days in May

It was all going on in Hayfield this weekend (not something you can say that often?), with a fantastic trio of races staring with the Hayfield May Queen…. on Friday.

Friday: Hayfield May Queen

Report courtesy of Paul Skuse:

The first of the three days in May and a little cracker of a race. Sadly not many GDH turned up for this which is a shame as it’s a great race for the first timers. What you need to know: First of all, no kit -hurray! The tactics are simple. It’s a fast one so run run fast! You need to give it the beans at the start or else risk getting caught in the bottle neck at the start of the climb.

The climb itself is runnable all the way but that almost makes it harder. It’s gradual in places and ramps up here and there but we Harriers run, we dont walk! Keep moving all the way up to the trig and then it’s time to head back down. Apart from the shortish patch through the wimberries (this bit cost me valuable time) and few narrow stoney paths, the descending is fast and fun. Thankfully for me there’s a little ramp up and a flat tarmac stretch at the end to stop the likes of Chris Jackson overtaking.

As for results, I bagged 14th in 23:24, Rich Martin, looking very strong at the minute took 28th in 26:41 This lad is having a great start to the season. Next in was a very happy looking Alex Critcher (the smile didnt last long apparently-read the Mount Famine race report :)). He took 49th in 28:28 with the ever youthful Joe Gavin coming in 60th in a time of 29:10. Claire Campbell was our only lady snatching the 97th place in a time of 34:59. If you’ve never done a fell race, this is a great start to your fell racing career. Hope to see you at the next starting line.

Saturday: Mount Famine

Rachel Walton took on the roving reporter duties for Mount Famine:

Second race in the Three Days In May series; having never done Mount Famine before and being given a pass out from (still) digging the bloody garden it would have been rude not to go. I quite like ‘running’ uphill. Which is just as well. This race somehow seems to go up for about ¾ of the distance. Including the comedy start. Judging by the sweariness, some racers (here’s looking at you Alex) weren’t impressed. So, after a comedy very steep up Elle Bank uphill bit, the race flattened out to merely normal uphill and then an up and down then up uphill all the way to Mount Famine and then South Head. A lovely steep descent down Dimpus clough simply so we could enjoy going back uphill to Mount Famine again followed, and then an undulating descent that still somehow included yet more uphill bits, into Hayfield. Didn’t see Richard and Rob all race – they were way ahead of me from the off. Becky skipped past me somewhere on Mount Famine, I finally caught up with Alex in the depths of Dimpus Clough, John came past me on one of the last descents (as usual), and we were close all the way back in. There were a couple of GDHers running in their away kit too – Chris Jackson in a not too shabby 5th place and Frank Fielding in 70th (1st V65).

GDH results:

55 Richard Martin 1.01.30

69 Rob Murphy   1.04.06

103 Rebecca Smith 1.11.10

117 Rachel Walton 1.15.03

118 John Stephenson  1.15.13

128 Alex Critcher  1.19.03

Sunday: Lantern Pike Dash

The Pixie of Doom, Immy Trinder, took her new pair of grippy fell running shoes to Lantern Pike and sent in this report:

For the second time today I have just accidentally typed ‘Lantern Puke’, which, whilst incorrect, rather accurately describes how a number of us were feeling at the end of this short but intense race.

For those who don’t know, at the end of Hayfield’s Three Days in May series, a number of people decide that it is a good idea to line up in a field, run to the bottom of it, jump a fence, run/walk/crawl 200m up to the top of Lantern Pike, and then bomb it back down, attempting to remember not to run straight into the fence on the way back.

There were some fierce battles occurring – Skusey against a teenager from Buxton, me against a teenager from Buxton… in fact let’s just not mention any more of the teenagers from Buxton, despite the fact that they occupied 20% of the top 20 places.

I was pleasantly surprised to see that I had come 16th, until I realised that I was very determinedly reading my own name where it actually said ‘Martin Thomson’. I can but dream.

The *actual* results are as follows, with a special mention to Skusey, who was so excited to be first V40 that he shouted his own name during the prizegiving – good effort on both counts.

13th Paul Skuse: 14:31 *1st V40*

19th Richard Martin:15:36

22nd Imogen Trinder: 15:42

23rd Lance Hamilton-Griffiths: 15:46

24th Matt Crompton: 16:03

38th Alan Scholefield: 17:56

Adam Crompton was flying the flag for the GDH Juniors, and was 15th in 8:10.

Kudos to Richard Martin for representing Glossopdale at all 3 of the Hayfield races this weekend!

Transylvania 100km

Lurking in the darkest corners of the woods in Transylvania were vile salivating beasts.  Hairy, dripping with sweat and foul smelling.  That’s right, it was William Mather, Luke Holme and Jason Hart.  They took on the Transylvanian 100km starting and finishing at Dracula’s Castle and climbing parts of the Southern Carpathian mountains.

I couldn’t resist having a browse at the start list and there were some fantastic names: Florin Alexandru Zoltan Neagu, Alexander De Wulf and, my absolute favourite, Barry Van Oven.  Here’s the official race report from Luke:

We turned up and raced – the end. Only joking. It’s taken a year of planning and Will buying 40 pair of gloves! 

Fast forward to May and after a 13 hour  journey to get to the village of Bran in Transylvania we were on the start line thinking what will kill us first, bears, wolves, vampires or the site of Wills shorts. 

The route was slightly shortened due Mount Omu having risks of avalanches so the distance was changed to roughly 50 miles and 17000ft. 

The weather was predicted to be rain and thunderstorms but just because Luke’s doing an ultra it was the complete opposite and was about 25 degrees (too hot). 

The route was extremely tough navigating through snow, muddy descents, broken trees to climb and steep inclines. Jason said the descents in the dark were gruelling with lots of mud and rocks to break the fall. 

Will decided he wanted to be the Usain bolt of the mountains and came in at 13:31 hours. Jason with also an impressive 17.53 hours and Luke about 8 days (20:15 hours) Anyone interested in an international event that doesn’t cost the earth and has no lottery, this is highly recommended. 

Old County Tops

The “Old County Tops” was first held in the distant past long before anyone can remember (1988).  The race takes in the tops of Helvellyn, Scafell Pike and Coniston before returning to Great Langdale for refreshments.  Tim “given up cycling this weekend because running is better” Budd gives us the lowdown.

Chris Webb, me, Jude Stansfield, Els Swan and Tim Culshaw headed to the rather delightful Langdale valley this weekend to enjoy the spectacular Old County Tops fell race. Tim didn’t do it on his own, but rather, joined forces with a running entity known only as “Carlos”. It wasn’t a hot day, but it was humid as you like. Chris led me along on a merry chase where we started too fast and generally slowed all day, Els and Jude set out at a steady pace, keeping it up all the way around in true Terminator style. Tim and Carlos.. I have no idea, but I bet they had fun – especially as Alice was somewhere on the course already a day overdue… There was a point as we approached Cockley Beck where I if someone said “are you Tim? Your wife is having contractions, we’ll give you a lift to the end to be with her” I probably would have said, “Yep, I’m Tim”.

As it was, Alice was by Blea Tarn shouting encouragement and taking photos, clearly unperturbed by any thought of impending birth.

A shout out must go to the Family Swan, Caitlin, Josie and Phyliss giving great support at Cockley Beck. A definite spirit raiser!

Chris and Tim – 7:41

Jude and Else – 11:45 (I think)

Tim and Carlos-  Not a clue. (the time… not them).

It’s an amazing race – a wonderful day out in the hills, but still a real testpiece. Despite feeling rubbish for the vast majority of it, it will remain on my recommend list for a long long time.

You can also read a detailed report of the suffering at Tim’s blog HERE

Great Manchester Half Marathon 

Big racing going on today over there in Manchester with the Great Run series descending on the city.  Ian Crutchley was acting suspiciously in the portaloos again and whilst he doesn’t go into details, I’m sure the police report will reveal all.  Two race reports for this one, first up from Ian:

How do you manage to sustain a pre-race head injury in a portaloo? Well, I did. I could elaborate on that, but sometimes the mystery’s just funnier. Jacked up on coffee and gels I didn’t realise I was bleeding till pointed out at the start line. The first 2 miles were a bit quick, but soon settled the pace at about 7.10, which was pushing it. But I had to do that to stand a chance to PB. Struggling in the last couple of miles, I managed to hold that pace till the end, but had no kick at all to give at the finish. Really pleased with an almost 2-minute PB at 1.33.53. Meanwhile, fellow bespectacled chappie Bartek Verde was having a crack at his PB, but it’s been a while, so he couldn’t remember what it actually was! Gunning for 1.45 today, he should be pretty pleased with 1.42.04.

Bartek Verde sent in the report below:

Signed up quite late and run in support of Mummy’s Star charity (that we all know and love).

I did a couple of halves before but that was years ago and I can’t remember my PB anymore. I figured 1:45 will be a good time to aim for. At 7:45am Manchester City centre was very calm. In fact it was dead quiet and after parking the car in Hulme with no issues whatsoever I started wondering if I got the dates right! But I soon found the start line and Mummy’s Star very own HQ set up in a fancy foyer of an office building in Peters Square.

After the usual faffing about, myself and Ian made our way to the start line, met some familiar faces there and got into the pen where we split up as he was going to run faster. I managed to locate the 1:45 pacer and stuck to him for the majority of the race.

Very nice weather for running. Pleasant route: city centre, Man City stadium, Man Utd stadium and back to Deansgate. Nice to visit the city centre once in a while – new buildings popping up everywhere!  Finished in 1:42:08 and had a (mostly) very enjoyable run. I suppose that’s my new PB then. Well done Ian for getting under your predicted time and to all GDHers doing 10k. It was nice chatting to you between the runs.

John West tuna in the goody bag made it all worth it!

Whilst not a Harrier, Vicky Stinton also completed her first half marathon whilst raising money for the Royal Manchester Children’s Hospital (who have helped us a lot) and also for CURE who help children in developing countries access treatment for clubfoot. Top running!

Great Manchester 10km

The much bigger event took place later in the day – I know this first-hand because I was attempting to drive out of Manchester at the time (a stupid idea).   Here’s the report from Jessica Camp:

Well, the pre-race nerves were in full force for us today (mainly for me ha!)

It was only my 3rd ever 10K but I was chasing a PB.

Myself, Wendy McMahon, Charmayne Brierley, Jo Brack, Kate Bowden and Laurie Barlow swapped our GDH vests for Mummy’s Star today… we had a fab day and was a pleasure to run for them!

Conditions were great and no way near as hot as last year (though the slow first mile was very frustrating.)

Well done to all!

Thank you to Pete and team for having us all today!

Jessica Camp 41:55 10K PB

Charmayne Brierley 51:59

Kate Bowden 1:05:34

Wendy McMahon 54:15

Laurie Barlow 1:01:13

Jo Brack 48:26

Kate Bee: 52:30 10K PB

Ras y Gader

An intrepid blue camper van rolled over the border into Wales this weekend so that Greg Wasinski could take on the Ras y Gader. Yes, I have no idea what that is either, but Greg fills us in with the details:

So I did the Ras y Gader for the first time, an out and back from Dolgellau to the top of Cadair Idris. Total distance was just under 18km with just over 900m of ascent. Fairly gentle incline for first section with some road and rooty forest track before hitting Cadair with a long section of rocky steps and trails going up before hitting a very shaley section that was a bit 1 step forward 2 steps back….Very much a ‘why do I do this?’ sort of climb! Coming down was a proper leg bashing experience where knowing the best lines made much more of a difference. The upper slopes saw runners scattered across them trying to find grassy sections and dodge the intermittent boulder patches. Passing off the shaley upper section it was then avoiding the zig zag path on the steep descent taking a much more direct route until what should be a fast run back into town, at least if your legs can still take it…

The atmosphere in Dolgellau before going is great with bands on hand and a bit of a party atmosphere. Great support on route as well. I struggled more than wanted to and so didn’t make up the time I expected on the descent in the second half, but was great to do a race that I wanted to do for ages.

Shining Tor Race: “double F”

Puzzled about the “double F”? Me too folks, read on for the report from Zoe Barton:

Lins Palmer, Mr Skuse, Mr Crutchley, Mr Critcher and myself waffled on to one another prior to the start. Efficiently organised with online booking by the affable and effusive Crazy Legs team. The field was stuffed with Chorlton runners and we were miffed not to have brought such numbers, yet remained unruffled. 

We huffed and puffed up a zigzag trail through woods. No piffling climb this and offally runnable.  Over moorland paths and then down quad-baffling flagstones. The uphill finish of yore has been removed, it’s different now. A rather offensive sprint across the dam brings this race to its end. What made me rate it double F? It’s full of false flats!

Well done glossopdalers . A tough little evening race and no mistake 

Fairfield Horseshoe 

Zoe Barton just clearly couldn’t stop racing this week and sent in the Fairfield Horseshoe report:

Matt Crompton and I travelled to Rydal Hall to have a leisurely run round the Fairfield Horseshoe , an A medium race of 9 miles with a typically lakes amount of ascent. The weather was surprisingly warm and even humid. We were cheerily waved off by Alice Willson and set off up a very long climb during which either the efforts of my midweek racing or just generally being under-trained slowed me down to a grumbling trudge within minutes. Matt assured me he was OK with a slower pace as he’s getting over a niggly hamstring.  It was the kind of pace which allowed him to take numerous pictures and chatter amiably about his experiences hiking the route. On the descent, disaster struck when I turned my ankle heavily on a rocky stretch so it became an exercise in getting back before the promised tea and flapjacks ran out. Thanks Matt for sticking with an even grumblier runner and making sure I got back OK.I was incredibly glad I had packed a small first aid kit containing ibuprofen or it would’ve been much ouchier than it was. 

The Trunce

Monday seems like ages ago.  I mean, it’s nearly Monday again already (sorry to remind everyone).  Caitlin Swan and Phil Swan are sticking with this one and here’s the report:

Caitlin and Phil maintained what is rapidly becoming their standard form for the 3rd Trunce race on Monday. Caitlin was 2nd girl and Phil was comfortably mid-pack, happily unhampered by pre-race lemonade this week.

Kong MM

Steven Pepper snuck in the Kong Mini Mountain Marathon and here are the details:

Nice evening out, good to be an area with no local knowledge. Got stuck on the wrong side of the river like a muppet. 

Parkrun

I thought with all the racing going on Parkrun may be a quiet affair, but no.  Seventeen harriers ran Glossop and showed everyone who is boss by taking 4 of the 5 top places (Steve Crossman, Caitlin Rice, Craig Leith and Lance Hamilton-Griffiths who also bagged a new PB)

Check out the consolidate club report HERE

#mpm

Top Mileage and climbing

As it’s been quite a short, easy report (!) I thought I’d add an extra bonus section.  It may catch on and be featured again, but it may not.  Which harrier has been out there gobbling up the mileage and elevation?  Well according to our club Strava page, as of 19:54 Sunday evening (the official cut-off time):

Chris Webb grabs the top spot with 89.4km.

Unsurprisingly, William Mather took on the most elevation with 4,575m (with Luke Holme and Jason Hart closely behind).

Anything Else?

On Tuesday, people ran around Hurst Crescent – I know because I drove past in my car and felt very guilty for not going.

There was a great social run on Thursday where everyone basically just ran to the pub.

Barring some apocalyptic event, Tuesday and Thursday will occur again next week, so please fill them with GDH club running.

As we get into the busy racing season, please, please, please send the reports and pictures to gdhweeklyreports@gmail.com.  It makes it so much easier when everything is in one place.

Brilliant running Harriers!

 

Wherever you look, there’s a Harrier – Weekly Report

The list of races I’ve found out about just seems to have grown and grown today, no matter where I turn, someone mentions another one!

It’s been a fantastic week and all of that grim winter training is clearly paying off with Harriers out and about all over the place bagging PBs, getting course records and just generally showing running who is the boss.

The Trunce

Let’s take a deep breath and wind all the way back to Monday when the first of nine races kicked off as part of “The Trunce Offroad Race Series”.  Phil and Caitlin Swan headed over to the other side of the Peak District to race and Caitlin came in with a brilliant 2nd Junior Female.  Elanor reliably informed me that Phil was not 2nd male…

Remember there are eight more races in the series around three weeks apart, so check it out if you fancy a Monday blast!

Manchester Marathon 

The sprawling metropolis that is Manchester.  Concrete and gleaming steel as far as the eye can see, from the hipster hideouts in the Northern Quarter to the monstrous Beetham Tower keeping a watchful eye over Deansgate and beyond.  Such large cities know how to put on big races…  well, only if you forget about the dodgy course measurements between 2013-2015 and the bag collection fiasco in 2016.

It’s all sorted out now though and it’s perfect PB territory.  As a bonus this year, a marathon can also be used as an official counter for the club road champs.  What happens when you get a load of hill runners and try and make them run on the flat? Does it work? Who was there? What happened?

It’s all over social media and it looked like a great race with some excellent results.  Blurred photographic evidence shows an unorthodox “piggyback” finish by Ian McGarry and Alan Scholefield.  I have no idea who was on who but, even more remarkably, their results are 5 seconds apart.

Manc Mara 4

Manc Mara 2

Sorry if I missed anyone out, let me know and I’ll update…

Steve Knowles – 2:54:34

Tim Culshaw – 3:42:26

Emma Rettig – 3:52:40

Ian Oates – 3:56:14

Ian McGarry – 4:13:05

Alan Scholefield – 4:13:10

Wendy McMahon – 4:35:12

Alan Byrne – 5:55:17

Manc Mara 1

manc mara 5

It also looks like we had some GDH volunteers out there.  Massive thanks to Jo Brack, Charmayne Lisa, John Pollard and Rick Gwilt for stepping in!

Manc Mara 3

Chicken run

I can’t believe they make you carry a chicken around the whole route!  That didn’t deter a load of Harriers though who turned up on Saturday for the club-champs counter.  Paul Skuse fills us in with the details:

The Chicken Run. What a belter! The sun was shining and a veritable swarm of GDH descended into Hayfield for the 2019 Chicken Run. Race HQ was the primary school with a nice range of activities for the kids such as bouncy castles, toy and book sales and the obligatory cake stall. I don’t think any GDH youngsters were running which was a shame –something to be remedied next year. Thanks to a heads up from Zoe, I knew I had to put some pace into the start as it bottlenecks almost immediately. This is a race for the fast trail runners. Jessica Camp, Sean Philips – get on this next year! Though there are a fair few climbs and descents, almost all of it is runnable. Conditions were pretty much perfect as the new CR shows so no kit was needed. Sorry but I’ve no idea about results but Jamie Helmer did bag the v40 prize – way to go Jamie. All those sneaky solo training sessions have paid off. I do know they had a nice banana bread at the end; that, with a cup of tea, in the sun surrounded by friends made for a really enjoyable Spring Saturday.

Chicken Run 1

The results aren’t out yet but it looks like we had Nick Ham, John Stephenson, Charm Briers, Paul Skuse, Frank Fielding, Jamie Helmer, Rob Murphey, Joe Travis, Ian Crutchley (as if he’d miss a race), Chris Jackson, Ben Falla, Tracey RobinsonRachel Walton, Lance Hamilton-Griffiths, Jamie Helmer, Lins Palmer, Zoe Barton and Rob Murphey.  The results will no doubt be posted on the GDH page soon.

Kielder ultra trail 50k

Wendy Trelease took on her first ultra this weekend in the Kielder Water and Forest Park, Northumberland.  Epic running!  Here is her report:

Flying the orange and blue colours at the Kielder ultra trail 50k. After a cold start (only 3 degrees) I soon warmed up and got into the swing of things. The conditions underfoot were somewhat boggy at times and there was a deep stream crossing at mile 4. But the feet held out and the weather conditions couldn’t have been better, staying dry throughout. A one lap beautiful course around Kielder water with stunning views from the high points in the race. Overall a very well organised event with lots of tasty nosh to be had. A pleasing time of 5.54 for my first trepid attempt over this distance. 

Kielder Ultra

Prague Marathon

There was a half-marathon in Prague and Sean Phillips did it in a blistering 1:22:06 (Strava).  There’s no stopping him!

The Four Inns

All I know about this race is that the kit list is huge and you have to run down the Snake.  With those two things in mind, I firmly forgot all about it.  Lucy Wasinski teamed up with some fellow speedsters and blasted round to claim the fastest ever ladies time!

Just before we get to Lucy’s report, I happened to be crossing the Snake myself on Saturday by Doctors Gate.  As I approached the race checkpoint, I heard one volunteer say to the other “Do NOT give him a hot dog!”.  So, there you go.  If you see me out running do not give me a hot dog, you never know what might happen.

It goes something like this, new girl starts at work – she invites me to join 4 inns ladies team – I agree – I find out they want to break the ladies record that’s stood for 10 years. Gulp. They thought this was pretty achievable if, unlike 2018, they didn’t stop at every checkpoint to sample hot dogs, rice pudding and whatever other delights were on offer. They also figured their packs were too heavy (not surprising with the “comprehensive” kit list) so I imagine that’s where a new addition to the team might come in handy…. hmmm.

After much stressing that I was gonna let these lot down on their quest for a new record, the 6.32am race start finally arrived. Fuelled by Greg’s good cooking on Fri (he’s a good un) we set off out of Holmbridge faster than I’d perhaps have gone so I just trailed along slightly behind the other 3 for a bit with plenty of negative thoughts going around my head. Several hours later it was with some relief I heard some cheering and whooping at the top of Torside Clough and could make out 2 figures silhouetted against the sun – never have I been happier to get a hug and some positive words of encouragement – MASSIVE THANKS Tim & Lynne for the support, you’ll never know what that meant, my head wasn’t in a happy place! After that it was many more miles of great conditions underfoot, hot sun, the not-to-be-missed chance of running along the Snake (just why?!), a couple of stiff climbs (or were they gentle and my legs just tired?), some of the best views in the Peaks, foot cramp, and many missed dining opportunities at the checkpoints (team orders not to faff and to just grab n go ;)!) and the miles gradually rolled by. We made it to Buxton in 8h49 to the standard low key ultra finish (as in where the heck is the finish line?) which was good enough for 2nd overall, and knocking just over 35 mins off the ladies team record. Result!

4inns-2

Howgill Fell Race

The Howgill Fell Race is 23km with a quad-aching 2,070m of climb.  As part of the English Championships there’s always going to be some quick times here.  Mark Davenport and Andrew Fox took on the challenge in the glorious English sunshine and it looks like they both had a fantastic race.  Here’s how they got on:

Andrew Fox – 3:36:11

Mark Davenport – 3:59:30

Three Shires LDWA

Steven Pepper was out doing a rather strange shaped run judging from Strava, but clocking in a big 48km.  I have the following detailed report: “B***ard of a route, no rest, all niggle, lots of nav. Great day out.”

Lincoln 10km

Big bottle necks at the start of the Lincoln 10km, but Paul Amos got round and enjoyed it.  That’s as much as I know.

Fleetwood 10km

Again, scant on the details but Paul Gatley took on the Fleetwood 10km, looks like a sub-50 from Strava.  Good work.

Parkrun Corner

Still a decent number of Harriers at Parkrun this weekend even with all of the racing going on.  Christine Peters claimed a new PB and David Chrystie-Lowe is ever creeping towards getting a free t-shirt for bagging 250.

Check out the consolidated club report HERE

Bob Graham Round

If you say it on Facebook it happened, right?  Luke Holme and Pete Wallroth claimed a Bob Graham Round by climbing the steps at the Moot Hall in Keswick and there is photographic evidence to prove it.  Well done chaps!

Bob Graham Round

Phew, anything else?

Tim “must’ve lost my running shoes” Budd took on the Ronde Van Calderdale (RVC) cycling race and needed a sudden, dramatic last-minute change of bike.  What’s the RVC anyway? Google tells me it’s “a cobbled climb classic around the Calderdale and Kirklees districts with a great combination of dramatic scenery, fast road sections and the added dimension of many different profiles of cobbled climbs.” 

*EDIT: The above only vaguely resembled the truth.  Tim rode the “Ronde Van Chinley” with Mattt Hux and Alice Swift. All refuelled with delicious pizza at the Paper Mill in Chinley afterward.

What’s next?

There’s a couple of other things to scribble into your filofaxes…

Our very own Herod Farm race takes place soon, on the 17th April.  There’s a few more volunteers needed but if you end up running, don’t forget there’s two climbs, so don’t burn out on the first one and start crying on the second (I wish I could take my own advice).  Mark Davenport is leading a race recce as a social run this Thursday 11th.

Tim Budd is planning the “not really a mountain marathon” navigation course from Glossop to Hope on 27th/28th April and I hear rumours of camping and the pub.  I do like the sound of these rumours and I’m sure Tim will be along soon with more details and to see how many people would be up for it, there was quite a few if I remember from the original facebook post.

Remember, get your race reports in to gdhweeklyreports@gmail.com to get processed by the GDH hacks.

 

Typical Rubbish Weather in February – Weekly Report

Just in case anyone hasn’t looked outside over the weekend, it’s been a glorious one.  Whilst there hasn’t been a huge amount of racing going on, Strava tells us that Harriers have been out Vitamin-D gathering all over the place, no doubt in preparation for a big Spring/Summer of racing.

Talking of racing, some great club-champs races coming up over the next few weeks, with Trafford 10km on 10th March (now sold-out) and Wolf’s Pit for the fell runners a week later (entry on day).  Get prepping for a short, sharp loop on the moor above Bradwell to bag some early champs points.

So, what’s been happening this week?

Thursday 10km Time-Trial

Last Thursday saw a gaggle of Harriers at the leisure centre, eager to see how their training was going at the GDH 10km time-trial.  It was so alluring even hardened fell-veteran Mark Davenport hung up his mudclaws for the evening and decided to hit the tarmac.  Jeroen Peters was claiming a previous 39-minute PB (the decade it was set remains unclear).  Welcome back to Paul Skuse who has been absent for a while but looked ready to eat up 10km.  Predicted times were bandied around but director Steve Page slotted everyone into place and set us off.

I can only account for my experience but a particular highlight was an orange-clad William Mather lurking at the end of Tavern Road as official race-photographer.  Paul Skuse summed it up on Facebook: “Nice seeing you but those are the worst photos I’ve seen”.  It’s true, he may as well have tried to have drawn us.

Time trial

William-Mather-Photography – Available for Weddings

Then, the hill.  Those few kms from Woolley Bridge island to the top of North Road.  It generally seems to be the main theme of conversation at the end.  But we’re Glossopdale Harriers, come on, flex those muscles, hills are our speciality!

After a few tears near the top, I made my way back to the leisure centre and most people seemed to arrive at a similar time.  Great running all – everyone was far too pessimistic with their predictions, check out the fantastic results below!

GDH Time trial results

Huddersfield 10km

Huddersfield.  They might be desperately clinging on to the bottom of the Premier League, but it’s not all about football – there’s a road race too.  Stevie Knowles sent in the details:

“Myself and Alex Critcher did the Huddersfield 10k this morning!  A brilliant tough hilly road race, definitely recommend it!  Glorious weather and nice cool crisp conditions for the 9.30am start. 

I finished 8th overall and 1st v45 Time 37.55

Alex Critcher finished 123rd overall, time 48.10.”

Great running both!

South Pennine 24

24? Does that mean 24-hours? 24-miles? 24-sausage rolls?  After a bit of research, I found out it’s pure hard-earned miles.  The race starts in Greenfield, up to Chew, down to Torside and along the reservoirs, popping up Wild Bank and back to Greenfield with a whole host of stuff in-between.

Roving reporter Lucy Wasinski was there and helped me with a few details.  Luke Holme, Pete Wallroth, Nick Ham and Steven Pepper were flying the GDH flag and rumours of flouting kit check rules are rife, but they all managed to get through.

SP24-2

Pete set off at a sprint and was in 2nd place for at least 10 seconds.  Luke had claimed he just wanted a nice day out, but race fever took over and he soon flew off into the distance with Steven.

Official results don’t appear to be out yet but I hear Steven and Luke came joint 7th in 4:51.  Nick Ham recalls how it was “Scorchio” and that he was wearing “very little towards the end”.  But hey, we’ve all been in those types of races.

Unfortunately Pete retired at checkpoint 3 (which is suspiciouly close to home).

SP24-1

Steven giving helpful navigation advice to Luke.  Nick with more clothes on than towards the end.

Ilkley Fell Race

I had to use Google to find out where Ilkley is, but Mary Jeal clearly already knew as she was racing there on Sunday.  The Ilkley Harriers claim it’s a toughie with steep, slippery and rocky descents.  Mary set off in this typical February weather and came in 197th in 103:55.  Getting a fantastic 3rd FV50 in the process!

Parkrun Corner

Plenty of Harriers at Glossop parkrun this week with Caitlin Rice first lady (second overall) and Craig Leith coming in third.  Clive Hope bagged a new PB with a 71.34% age-grade – great running!

William Mather took to the track at Stretford and ran an all-time PB of 19:27 – rumours are that he only did it so that he could beat his sister.  Time to get some track spikes in surely?

Harriers were parkrunning all around the country (and some out of the country).  Check out the consolidated club report HERE

Anything else?

Don’t forget all subs are due this Thursday 28th February.  Miss the date and you’re banished from the club forever.  Probably.

After the roaring success of the time trial, Paul Skuse has volunteered to run another one this week.  Get yourself down to the leisure centre on Thursday for 7pm to give it a go!

Jeroen will have a lung-bursting session planned to get us all race-ready on Tuesday.

Remember, get your race reports in to gdhweeklyreports@gmail.com to make sure you’re included!

That’s a wrap folks – Last report in January

It’s that time of the year where new year resolutions are crumbling and dry-January folks have their eyes on next Friday.  We’ve all battled through Blue Monday and despite it initially looking like not much racing was going on there’s actually been a fair bit of GDH action this weekend.  We’ve received some detailed reports, so grab a brew/beer/gin/energy gel and settle down for the weekly news.

Before we launch into the full report, just a reminder that next weekend is the first of the club fell champs races – the Mickleden Straddle.  It’s a “BL” which I’m reliably informed means its Bloody Long.  I’ve just checked and it looks like the race is actually full, which renders this reminder a little useless.  Maybe you can bribe the organiser for a place if you haven’t got one already?  It’s a lesson to get those Champs entries in early!

Whilst we’re on reminders, it’s the club AGM on Wednesday at the Oakwood 7:30pm.  I’ve unfortunately not been able to attend one so I can’t reliably report on what happens, but there is an agenda and I hear there is generally some chair throwing at the end.  So definitely worth making an appearance.

Lyme Park Night Run

I’ve ran this one a couple of times myself and it’s a cracker.  Especially when you end up covered in glitter at the Ram’s Head in Disley and have to run for the last train… but that’s a completely different story.

Reports of the evening are thin on the ground, but Liam Amos is pushing strong rumours that he beat his dad.  However, Strava never lies and it looks to me like Paul Amos had a clear lead by 45 seconds.  We might need a video replay to settle this one.  Wendy McMahon described it as “ridiculously muddy” and perhaps she can tell us who was really over the line first?

Tigger Tor

Anyone seen Chris?

Nick Ham and Chris Jackson raced the Tigger Tor – a 9.7 mile romp somewhere east of here.  Chris found it “pretty hard work.  Especially with the headwind”.  Perhaps he meant headband, I don’t know.  Nick sent in a long report, some may say longer than his shorts, but you decide:

Long overdue, this was my first race from Sheffield Tigers RUFC. I’d plotted what I thought would be a likely route using Tracklogs and printed it out on A4 at 1:25,000. The distance came out to 9.6 miles – identical to official distance so I couldn’t be far off. I’d studied the weather forecast so went prepared for icy gales. In the clubhouse I spotted than man tower otherwise known as Chris Jackson. He was getting his excuses in early, saying something about coming back from injury and not having raced in AGES (Hit The Trail didn’t count as a proper race – yeah, right Chris). 😉

The kit check and registration queue was very long, with FRA rules rigorously enforced. Quite right too. I was going to run in full waterproof body cover to keep the wind out. I wasn’t wearing much underneath that, mind you. 😉 We gathered outside to wait to be checked through into the starting pen to ensure that all starters were correctly recorded. There were hundreds of us and we had to keep on squeezing forward to make room at the back.

Finally we were off, up the A625, right along Redcar Brook in a conga line (a familiar feature throughout the race), right on the lane at the top and left up the track. Halfway up, runners seemed to split, some veering off-piste to the left and others continuing up the track to the right. My assumed route followed the track so that’s what I did. MISTAKE! At the top we turned left to eventually join the others who had taken the short cut. We followed one streamline down to the one I had assumed. From now on I would just follow everyone else while keeping an eye on map and compass to compare. All I can say is that the single person trods we conga’d along did not match up with some paths on the map that we could have followed. Call it evolution.

The wind was vicious but I was just the right temperature in my clobber as I pootled along at my physical limit. At the end there was over a mile of downhill road, which did me in before the final bit of uphill to the rugby field: I have to own up to walking; I was wrecked; I got overtaken a bit; nothing new. I crossed the line in 1:55, which is OK. Anything under 2 hours will do me (but I must go back next year to follow the correct route and see if I can knock a few seconds off.) 🙂

Finally, I have finally inherited an old GPS watch and this was my second race so recorded (first one was yesterday’s Woodbank parkrun). So, after 23 years, thousands of races and millions of miles (almost), I am now official. From this weekend, it didn’t never happen.

The results are out:

Chris Jackson: (racing for Pennine) 1:29:27

Nick Ham: 1:54:48

Big Orienteering Weekend – Edinburgh

I was under the impression that Glossop was the north but apparently, there’s more.  Emma Peters brings us news of her annual attempt to navigate around Edinburgh at their “Big Orienteering Weekend”.

Part 1:  I travelled up to Edinburgh on Saturday morning (07:43 train, an ungodly time for a Saturday!…) with the Newcastle Uni Fell Running and Orienteering Club. We always attend this event as a club and this is my 4th year in a row, it’s such a great trip!

On the Saturday we do an urban orienteering event. Slight change this year as the World Orienteering Championships come to Edinburgh in 2022 so there’s currently an embargo on racing in the actual centre. However, this meant that we were based in a new area, so although being in a new place was of no help to my navigation, I really loved exploring a different area of the city. Things went more or less alright save for 1 pesky control point in a multi-levelled area that even had extra restrictions due to building works. So with that control taking me over 10 minutes to find I finished around 75th/95 competitors at last check…

Currently writing this as I refuel with coffee and cake before the Burns night ceilidh this evening- no rest for the wicked!

Part 2: So Sunday’s fell orienteering event has historically always gone very badly for me (please feel free to dig up my report from last year when I was out in a blizzard and had dropped my map…), so this year I dropped down a category to do a green race with the hopes of actually finding my way. I did a proper compass bearing at each control and took the time to work out where I was in the maze of paths in Holyrood park and by some miracle I found all the controls fairly easily! So not a quick time, but satisfying navigation. And actually when I finished I was ranked 1st senior female. Unfortunately I have no doubt that there were many more yet to take on the course, but for now let’s have it in writing that I spent time at the top.

Tentative plans for next year are forming in my mind of going up early enough for the Friday night sprint event and then a parkrun before the city and fell events so watch this space…

Northern Cross Country Championships

Chris Webb was aiming for a top-200 place at the Northern XC Championship.  No problem for a man of his calibre?  Read on to find out how he did:

I headed to Pontefract Racecourse this Saturday to see how I stacked up against the best cross country runners in the North (AKA: “going to get your backside kicked by a load of fast lads”) A surprisingly mild and dry day meant the all the talk pre-race was how great conditions were and how fast the course was running…I was praying for rain and mud. 800ish men lined up and the start was the usual warp-speed assault on the first corner. As I’ve found out before, 5:29min/mile (my first split) is NOWHERE in a field like this and I was already way down and surrounded by blokes that seemed far too comfortable considering the speed we were going on the undulating course. The race was longer than the usual local leagues at 12km, 3 long laps for the Senior Men in and around the horse race course. Anyway, despite the usual feeling of an impending heart-attack I managed not to completely fall apart. The aim was to finish top-200…I was 199th! It would be nice to get a better Glossopdale turnout for these big championships races in 2020, it’s great to be a part of and to see how you compare with the best runners.  In my case, I’d say there’a room for improvement!

Marmot Dark Mountains

Tim Culshaw and John Ryan took on the Marmot Dark Mountains which takes the classic two-day mountain marathon format, screws it up, and packs it all into one night. All the gossip below, sounds like a toughie:

John Ryan (mostly of Carnethy Hill Runners, sometimes of Glossopdale) and I entered the Dark Mountains elite course in 2017 and found that it required better legs and more navigational skill than we possessed. This year, we changed to the A course, and took preparation seriously. I bought some ski goggles and reviewed the GPS trace of 2017’s horror show. John prepared by removing the jack and wheel nut key from his car.

Once John had spent a couple of hours finding the means to fix his puncture, we set off an hour late, at 9pm, assured by the race organiser that we wouldn’t be disadvantaged, although the 11am course closure time would still apply. But obviously nearly 14 hours would be enough, so we didn’t need to worry.

After our chastening experience in the elite course two years ago, we took a conservative approach: stay warm; walk a lot to avoid getting lost or tired; if possible, choose routes that will be forgiving of mistakes. This was going pretty well for a while – we made a few medium blunders, but we were never totally lost. Things started to get more difficult when the heavy rain was replaced by heavy snow then 50mph winds and -4C temperatures. With low visibility and snow-covered ground, a couple of the checkpoints were impossible for us to find quickly. By the time we reached the halfway point, we were very tired and slow, facing a second half all into the wind.

We started worrying about the 11am cut-off, but although tired, we were staying warm enough, so we kept going. We clearly weren’t going to win, but we would be pleased to complete the course. As we started ‘towards’ the fourth from last, we had plenty of time to finish.

Unfortunately, I was totally wrecked and my brain was working even less well than my legs. My navigation became appalling, although as far as I was concerned it was perfect: I argued that my compass wasn’t pointing north, and the Pennines, which I could see on the horizon, were in the wrong place. At one point, I genuinely couldn’t remember John’s name. I guided John to a control that he helpfully pointed out was number 3, while we were looking for 15, which was 4km away. John wrested our only remaining map and compass from me and we discussed whether we should call it a day – at our current pace we had no chance. We decided that the time for quitting would have been about eight hours earlier, so we should give it a go. Anyway, we’d feel better about ourselves if we quit in 20 minutes once we were certain finishing was impossible

For the next 50 minutes, John helpfully carried my bag and I gave absolutely everything I had. Beating the cut-off remained just within reach, but still unlikely. My main worry was that if we got timed out, I’d feel like I should try it again next year. Even as we entered the race HQ we weren’t sure we were in time. We staggered over the line and dibbed the final control at 10:59, with less than one-minute left. We took 13 hours and 49 minutes to come last out of six finishers in the A class.

Parkrun Corner

It looked like an epic battle at Parkrun on Saturday with Harriers making up six of the top ten.  Sean Phillips came in first with Steve Knowles a few seconds later who bagged a PB in the process, followed by Steve Page, Craig Leith, Phil Swan and Matt Crompton.

Immy Trinder came in as first lady, with Josie Swan second with a fantastic new PB.  She also looks to be getting close to joining the 100 club – great work!

Several Harriers seem to be edging towards the 250 landmark – that’s a lot of laps of Manor Park.  We all love laps of Manor Park, don’t we? #MPM

Scattering ourselves around the country, there was plenty of action elsewhere – check out the consolidated club report HERE

Anything else?

Chris Webb’s XC sessions are going strong every Wednesday – this week is long loops with large lungs needed – be there (or at the AGM).  Tuesday training session and Thursday social all going on as normal.

Phew…. so there you go.  January almost boxed off.  Remember, if you want to make sure you get a mention send your scribblings and photos to gdhweeklyreports@gmail.com  We have a team on standby eagerly anticipating weekly news.